Bishop State Community College

Bishop State Community College
Bishop State clock tower May 2012.jpg
Former names
Alabama State College - Mobile Center
Mobile State Junior College
S.D. Bishop State Junior College
TypePublic historically black community college
Established1927; 95 years ago (1927)
AffiliationAlabama Community College System
PresidentOlivier Charles
DeanDr. Kathryn Pavey
Location, ,
United States

30°41′39″N 88°3′27″W / 30.69417°N 88.05750°W / 30.69417; -88.05750Coordinates: 30°41′39″N 88°3′27″W / 30.69417°N 88.05750°W / 30.69417; -88.05750
CampusMain Campus
Southwest Campus
Carver Campus
Baker-Gaines Central Campus
City of Semmes Training Center
Theodore Oaks Shopping Center - Suite B
Truck Driving Site
NicknameWildcats
Sporting affiliations
NJCAA
ACCC
Websitewww.bishop.edu
Bishop State Logo.PNG

Bishop State Community College (BSCC) is a public, historically black community college with campuses and facilities throughout Mobile and Washington Counties in Alabama. The college was founded in Mobile, Alabama, in 1927, and is accredited by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges. It offers more than 50 associate degree and certificate programs.[1][2]

BSCC's athletic teams compete in the Alabama Community College Conference (ACCC) of the National Junior College Athletic Association (NJCAA). They are collectively known as the Wildcats.[3][4]

History

Bishop State Community College was founded in 1927 as the Mobile, Alabama, extension of Alabama State College, and initially offered courses to African-American certified teachers. In 1936, it was organized into a two-year college and renamed Alabama State College - Mobile Center, with O.H. Johnson serving as the first dean. In 1965, Alabama legislation officially declared BSCC a state junior college independent from Alabama State College, and it was renamed Mobile State Junior College. The Alabama State Board of Education renamed the college S.D. Bishop State Junior College for its first president, Dr. Sanford D. Bishop, in 1971. In 1989, the board renamed it Bishop State Community College due to its expanded career, vocational, transfer and community service offerings.[5][6][7]

Historically, BSCC has primarily served the inner-city residents of Mobile and Prichard, Alabama to prepare them for open industry positions and career advancement.[8]

Campus

BSCC has seven on-site campuses in Mobile County. Its five off-site locations are high schools throughout Mobile and Washington Counties.[9]

Mobile Campuses

Main Campus

Main Campus is located at 351 North Broad Street. It contains 14 buildings and covers 15 acres (0.061 km2). The campus was acquired in 1942, making it BSCC's original building when the college was first established.[6][10][5]

As of February 2021, the Mobile County Commission approved $350,000 to fund the construction of the Advanced Manufacturing Center and Health Sciences Facility on Main Campus. The 80,000-square-foot (7,400 m2) Advanced Manufacturing Center is designed for skilled workforce development training grounds for careers in process technology, industrial maintenance, electronics engineering technology and robotics, among others. The Health Sciences Facility will include a 1,150 square foot (107 m2) nursing simulation site to train nursing students in patient care. Both buildings were scheduled to open in Fall 2021.[11][12]

Southwest Campus

Southwest Campus is located at 925 Dauphin Island Parkway. Established in 1947 as Southwest State Technical College, a vocational school, it was consolidated into BSCC in 1991. The campus covers 42 acres (0.17 km2) and contains seven buildings.[6][13][7]

Carver Campus

Carver Campus is located at 414 Stanton Road. Established in 1962 as Carver State Technical College, a vocational school, it was consolidated into BSCC in 1991. The campus covers 9 acres (0.036 km2) and contains six buildings.[6][14][7]

Baker-Gaines Central Campus

Baker-Gaines Central Campus is located at 1365 Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Avenue. In 1995, the Mobile County School Board sold the campus, formerly Central High School, to BSCC for one dollar. The two-story building sits on 5 acres (0.020 km2). It is home to the Division of Health Related Professions, a museum with Central High School and early BSCC artifacts, a child-care center, bookstore, multimedia center, cafeteria facilities and a 1,200-seat auditorium.[6][15][7]

City of Semmes Training Center

The Semmes location is at 9010 Forest Street in Semmes, Alabama. The facility offers Art, English, Math, Psychology and Speech Communication program courses.[16]

Theodore Oaks Shopping Center - Suite B

The Theodore location is at 5808 US-90 in Theodore, Alabama. The facility offers Art, English, Math, Psychology and Speech Communication program courses.[17]

Truck Driving Site

The Truck Driving Site is located at 4551 Halls Mill Road in Mobile. It houses BSCC's commercial driver's license training program.[18][19]

Administration and organization

BSCC operates under five divisions: Academic Transfer (general education), Health Science Professions, Career Technical Education, Adult Education/GED and Workforce Development.[20]

A typical academic year contains two 15-week terms during the fall (August–December) and spring (January–May). Within the terms are two four-week accelerated sessions or mini terms. The full summer term is ten weeks long (May-August). An academic year begins on the first day of the fall term and ends on the last day of the summer term.[21]

BSCC's endowment had a market value of approximately $152,000 in the fiscal year that ended in 2019.[22]

Academics and programs

BSCC has an open admissions policy.[2][5] The college offers dual enrollment programs to local high school students.[23] In addition to its associate and certificate degree programs, BSCC offers personal enrichment, professional enhancement and career training courses.[24]

BSCC has transfer agreements with every public four-year institution in Alabama. The agreements allow students to automatically transfer after completing an associate degree at BSCC.[25]

BSCC is a Student Support Services TRIO program participant. The government-funded program helps educationally disadvantaged and disabled students graduate from college and supports low-income and first-generation college students in achieving their career and economic goals.[26]

Student Life

Student Body

As of fall 2020, BSCC's student body consists of 2,176 students. There are 35 percent full time and 65 percent part time students.[2]

Demographics of student body in fall 2020[2]
Full and Part Time Students U.S. Census[a][27]
International 2% N/A
Multiracial American 4% 2.8%
Black/African American 57% 13.4%
American Indian and Alaska Native 1% 1.3%
Asian 2% 5.9%
Non-Hispanic White American 29% 60.1%
Hispanic/Latino American 2% 18.5%
Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander 0% 0.2%
Other/Unknown 3% N/A

Organizations

Several student clubs and organizations operate at BSCC, including honors societies and student government, special interest and service organizations. Campus groups include: Barbering and Hair Styling Association, College Choir, International Student Organization, Pep Squad and STEM Club.[28][7][29]

Athletics

The BSCC athletic association chairs six varsity athletic programs. The teams are collectively known as the Wildcats, and belong to the Alabama Community College Conference (ACCC) and Region 22 of the National Junior College Athletic Association (NJCAA). Men's sports include: basketball, baseball and golf. Women's sports include: basketball, fast-pitch softball and volleyball.[30][31][7]

Notable alumni

See also

Notes

  1. ^ People who identify as Hispanic/Latino are included in applicable race categories.

References

  1. ^ "About". Bishop State Community College. Retrieved 13 October 2021.
  2. ^ a b c d "College Navigator - Bishop State Community College". National Center for Education Statistics. Retrieved 25 October 2021.
  3. ^ "Athletics". Bishop State Community College. Retrieved 25 October 2021.
  4. ^ "Alabama Community College Conference". Alabama Community College Conference. Retrieved 25 October 2021.
  5. ^ a b c Thomason, Michael (2010). Historic Mobile: An Illustrated History of the Mobile Bay Region. HPN Books. p. 92. ISBN 978-1-935377-23-8. Retrieved 25 October 2021.
  6. ^ a b c d e "Report on the Bishop State Community College Mobile, Alabama October 1, 2018 through September 30, 2019". Alabama Department of Examiners of Public Accounts. Department of Examiners of Public Accounts. Retrieved 25 October 2021.
  7. ^ a b c d e f "Bishop State Community College (BSCC)". Encyclopedia of Alabama. Retrieved 22 October 2021.
  8. ^ Humanities, United States Congress Senate Committee on Labor and Human Resources Subcommittee on Education, Arts, and (1991). Reauthorization of the Higher Education Act of 1965: Hearings Before the Subcommittee on Education, Arts, and Humanities of the Committee on Labor and Human Resources, United States Senate, One Hundred Second Congress, First Session on ... March 26, Montpelier, VT ... March 21, April 11, and 26, 1991, Washington, DC. U.S. Government Printing Office. pp. 1259–1260. ISBN 978-0-16-035792-3. Retrieved 25 October 2021.
  9. ^ "Contact Us-General Information". Bishop State Community College. Retrieved 1 November 2021.
  10. ^ "Main Campus". Bishop State Community College. Retrieved 13 October 2021.
  11. ^ "Mobile County Commission approves $350,000 to fund two building projects at Bishop State". FOX10 News. 23 February 2021. Retrieved 26 October 2021.
  12. ^ "NAMING OPPORTUNITIES". Bishop State Community College Foundation. Retrieved 27 October 2021.
  13. ^ "Southwest Campus". Bishop State Community College. Retrieved 13 October 2021.
  14. ^ "Carver Campus". Bishop State Community College. Retrieved 13 October 2021.
  15. ^ "Baker-Gaines Central Campus". Bishop State Community College. Retrieved 13 October 2021.
  16. ^ "City of Semmes Training Center". Bishop State Community College. Retrieved 13 October 2021.
  17. ^ "Theodore Oaks Shopping Center - Suite B". Bishop State Community College. Retrieved 13 October 2021.
  18. ^ "Truck Driving Site". Bishop State Community College. Retrieved 13 October 2021.
  19. ^ "Truck Driving". Bishop State Community College. Retrieved 2 November 2021.
  20. ^ "Programs of Study". Bishop State Community College. Retrieved 25 October 2021.
  21. ^ "Academic Calendar". Bishop State Community College. Retrieved 25 October 2021.
  22. ^ "Bishop State Community College". Data USA. Retrieved 25 October 2021.
  23. ^ "Dual Enrollment". Bishop State Community College. Retrieved 25 October 2021.
  24. ^ "Ed2Go Online Continuing Education". Bishop State Community College. Retrieved 27 October 2021.
  25. ^ "Academic Transfer". Bishop State Community College. Retrieved 25 October 2021.
  26. ^ "SSS TRIO Program". Bishop State Community College. Retrieved 25 October 2021.
  27. ^ "U.S. Census Bureau QuickFacts: United States". U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved 24 August 2021.
  28. ^ "Student Organizations". Bishop State Community College. Retrieved 27 October 2021.
  29. ^ Chambers, Crystal R.; Crumb, Loni (9 November 2020). African American Rural Education: College Transitions and Postsecondary Experiences. Emerald Group Publishing. p. 165. ISBN 978-1-83909-870-3. Retrieved 1 November 2021.
  30. ^ "Athletics". Bishop State Community College. Retrieved 22 October 2021.
  31. ^ "About the ACCC". Alabama Community College Conference. Retrieved 27 October 2021.
  32. ^ Walsh, Devon (26 March 2021). "MPD Chief promoted, search underway for a replacement". WKRG News 5. Retrieved 1 November 2021.
  33. ^ Inabinett, Mark (16 December 2019). "Mel Showers to enter Bishop State Sports Hall of Fame". AL.com. Retrieved 1 November 2021.
  34. ^ "CIR Fights 'Whites Only' Scholarships in Alabama". Center for Individual Rights. 29 September 1999. Retrieved 13 May 2012.