Doug Brown (runner)

Doug Brown
Medal record
Men's athletics
Representing the  United States
World Cross Country Championships
Silver medal – second place 1983 Gateshead Team race

Charles Douglas Brown (born March 1, 1952 in Detroit, Michigan) is a retired American track and field athlete, whose specialty was the Steeplechase.

Early career

While competing for the University of Tennessee he won the NCAA Championship in the steeplechase twice in a row, which qualified him to run in the 1973 World University Games. After college he ran with the Athletics West track club, one of the first mega teams sponsored by Nike. He was United States (Amateur Athletic Union) National Champion in 1973 and 1980.[1]

Olympic athlete

Brown competed for the United States in two Olympic Games, running the steeplechase at the 1972 and 1976 Olympics.[2] He qualified for the 1980 U.S. Olympic team but did not compete due to the U.S. Olympic Committee's boycott of the 1980 Summer Olympics in Moscow, Russia. He was one of 461 athletes to receive a Congressional Gold Medal instead.[3] He was a surprise second place at the 1972 Olympic Trials, sprinting from a battle to make the team around leading contender and hometown favorite, Steve Savage, who had been battling Mike Manley for the lead. In 1976, with 1972 winner Manley injured hitting a barrier in the first few laps of the race, Brown outsprinted Henry Marsh and picked up the win by 0.03 of a second. That was not even the most thrilling finish in that race, as Mike Roche fell over the last barrier, managed to right himself and outsprint Don Timm for the final position on the team.[4]

1983 IAAF World Cross Country Championships

Brown ran on the American silver medal winning team at the 1983 IAAF World Cross Country Championships.

References

  1. ^ "USA Track & Field - USA Outdoor Track & Field Champions". Usatf.org. Retrieved 2016-08-20.
  2. ^ "Doug Brown Bio, Stats, and Results | Olympics at". Sports-reference.com. 1952-03-01. Archived from the original on 2020-04-17. Retrieved 2016-08-20.
  3. ^ Caroccioli, Tom; Caroccioli, Jerry (2008). Boycott: Stolen Dreams of the 1980 Moscow Olympic Games. Highland Park, IL: New Chapter Press. pp. 243–253. ISBN 978-0942257403.
  4. ^ Richard Hymans. "The History of the United states Olympic Trials : Track and Field" (PDF). Usatf.org. Archived from the original (PDF) on 2012-06-20. Retrieved 2016-08-20.