Hamilton, Alabama

Hamilton, Alabama
Location in Marion County, Alabama
Location in Marion County, Alabama
Coordinates: 34°8′7″N 87°59′20″W / 34.13528°N 87.98889°W / 34.13528; -87.98889Coordinates: 34°8′7″N 87°59′20″W / 34.13528°N 87.98889°W / 34.13528; -87.98889
CountryUnited States
StateAlabama
CountyMarion
Area
 • Total38.08 sq mi (98.6 km2)
 • Land38.06 sq mi (98.6 km2)
 • Water0.01 sq mi (0.03 km2)
Elevation
489 ft (149 m)
Population
 • Total7,042
 • Density185.01/sq mi (71.43/km2)
Time zoneUTC-6 (Central (CST))
 • Summer (DST)UTC-5 (CDT)
ZIP code
35570
Area code(s)205, 659
FIPS code01-32848
GNIS feature ID0119627
Websitehamiltoncityal.org

Hamilton is a city in and the county seat of Marion County, Alabama, United States. It incorporated in 1896[3] and since 1980 has been the county's largest city, surpassing Winfield. It was previously the largest town in 1910.[4] At the 2020 census, the population was 7,042.[2]

History

Hamilton was founded in the early 19th century by settlers who moved to the Alabama Territory from Tennessee, Kentucky, Virginia, Georgia and the Carolinas. It is built upon lands that once served as "hunting grounds" for the Chickasaw people. The city was first called "Toll Gate", but its name later changed in honor of one of its distinguished citizens, Captain Albert James Hamilton (known as A.J. Hamilton), who had represented Marion County in the state legislature in the sessions of 1869, 1874 and 1875. Captain Hamilton donated forty acres of his land to the town. The same forty acres were then divided into lots and sold to help defray the cost of building the courthouse.[5] The Toll Gate community was elected in 1881 to be the next county seat, and by 1883 the Marion County courthouse in Pikeville had ceased to be functional. When the courthouse was moved from Pikeville to Toll Gate, the town's name was then changed from Toll Gate to Hamilton. On March 30, 1887, the newly built county courthouse was destroyed by fire.[6] It was again rebuilt with wood, but replaced in 1901 with native sandstone.

During the Civil War, Union forces passed through the town in search of goods and horses. A detachment of Wilson's Cavalry destroyed by fire the plantation belonging to the Helvingstons on the Military Ford, south of Toll Gate (Hamilton).[7]

Geography

Hamilton is located west of the center of Marion County, in the valley of the Buttahatchee River. Interstate 22 passes around the southern and western sides of the city, with access from Exits 7, 11, 14, and 16. I-22 leads west 45 miles (72 km) to Tupelo, Mississippi, and southeast 89 miles (143 km) to Birmingham. U.S. Routes 43 and 278 pass through Hamilton. US 43 leads north 53 miles (85 km) to Florence, while US 278 leads east 74 miles (119 km) to Cullman. The two highways join at the center of Hamilton and lead south together 13 miles (21 km) to Guin.

According to the United States Census Bureau, Hamilton has a total area of 38.1 square miles (99 km2), of which 0.01 square miles (0.03 km2), 0.04%, are water.[1] The Buttahatchee River, a tributary of the Tombigbee River, flows northeast to southwest through the city, east of downtown.

Demographics

Historical population
Census Pop.
1900235
191042279.6%
192048715.4%
193069542.7%
19401,00244.2%
19501,62362.0%
19601,93419.2%
19703,08859.7%
19805,09364.9%
19905,78713.6%
20006,78617.3%
20106,8851.5%
20207,0422.3%
U.S. Decennial Census[8]

2000 census

At the 2000 census there were 6,786 people, 2,695 households, and 1,800 families living in the city. The population density was 188.0 inhabitants per square mile (72.6/km2). There were 3,065 housing units at an average density of 84.9 per square mile (32.8/km2). The racial makeup of the city was 90.41% White, 7.59% Black or African American, 0.32% Native American, 0.49% Asian, 0.03% Pacific Islander, 0.49% from other races, and 0.68% from two or more races. 1.71% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.[9] Of the 2,695 households 28.3% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 52.6% were married couples living together, 11.3% had a female householder with no husband present, and 33.2% were non-families. 30.6% of households were one person and 14.4% were one person aged 65 or older. The average household size was 2.26 and the average family size was 2.81.

The age distribution was 19.8% under the age of 18, 8.9% from 18 to 24, 29.0% from 25 to 44, 25.9% from 45 to 64, and 16.5% 65 or older. The median age was 40 years. For every 100 females, there were 106.9 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 106.6 males.

The median household income was $27,489 and the median family income was $34,485. Males had a median income of $26,362 versus $18,681 for females. The per capita income for the city was $17,505. About 12.0% of families and 17.8% of the population were below the poverty line, including 23.7% of those under age 18 and 19.6% of those age 65 or over.

2010 census

At the 2010 census there were 6,885 people, 2,717 households, and 1,793 families living in the city. The population density was 190.7 inhabitants per square mile (73.6/km2). There were 3,096 housing units at an average density of 85.8 per square mile (33.1/km2). The racial makeup of the city was 89.3% White, 7.7% Black or African American, 0.4% Native American, 0.2% Asian, 0.0% Pacific Islander, 1.2% from other races, and 1.1% from two or more races. 3.1% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.[10] Of the 2,717 households 25.2% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 48.1% were married couples living together, 13.7% had a female householder with no husband present, and 34.0% were non-families. 30.9% of households were one person and 13.7% were one person aged 65 or older. The average household size was 2.30 and the average family size was 2.83.

The age distribution was 19.9% under the age of 18, 7.5% from 18 to 24, 25.1% from 25 to 44, 28.4% from 45 to 64, and 19.0% 65 or older. The median age was 43.2 years. For every 100 females, there were 106.8 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 111.2 males.

The median household income was $31,297 and the median family income was $42,361. Males had a median income of $31,112 versus $30,542 for females. The per capita income for the city was $17,442. About 12.1% of families and 19.2% of the population were below the poverty line, including 30.1% of those under age 18 and 15.5% of those age 65 or over.

2020 census

Hamilton racial composition[11]
Race Num. Perc.
White (non-Hispanic) 5,907 83.88%
Black or African American (non-Hispanic) 491 6.97%
Native American 30 0.43%
Asian 23 0.33%
Pacific Islander 7 0.1%
Other/Mixed 292 4.15%
Hispanic or Latino 292 4.15%

As of the 2020 United States census, there were 7,042 people, 2,684 households, and 1,695 families residing in the city.

Arts and culture

Several cemeteries in Hamilton still celebrate annual Decoration Days in the spring and summer.[citation needed]

Artifacts

Festivals

  • Jerry Brown Arts Festival[14] (held annually the first weekend in March)
  • Buttahatchee River Fall Fest[15] (held annually in October)
  • Hamilton's Hometown Christmas[16] (held annually in December)

Parades

  • Homecoming parade (sponsored by Hamilton High School each fall)
  • Hamilton Christmas parade (held annually in December)

Parks and recreation

  • E.T. Sims Jr. Recreation Center, park, and playground
  • Key Branch Nature Trail and Aggieland Disc Golf course
  • Splash Pad playground

Education

Hamilton is a part of the Marion County School District. Hamilton Elementary School, Hamilton Middle School, and Hamilton High School serve the Hamilton area.

Hamilton has a branch campus of Bevill State Community College.

Media

Hamilton's local newspaper, The Journal Record, has a second office in Winfield, Alabama.

Hamilton is home to two local television stations: WMTY TV 46 (cable channel 5 ), and TV8-WATVC.

Infrastructure

Marion County – Rankin Fite Airport is located in Hamilton.[17]

Notable people

References

  1. ^ a b "2021 U.S. Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved April 12, 2022.
  2. ^ a b "Hamilton city, Alabama: 2020 DEC Redistricting Data (PL 94-171)". U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved April 12, 2022.
  3. ^ Hellmann, Paul T. (14 February 2006). Historical Gazetteer of the United States. Routledge. ISBN 1135948593 – via Google Books.
  4. ^ 1820-2010 U.S. Censuses research on Marion County, Alabama communities
  5. ^ The Heritage of Marion County, Alabama, vol. 47, Clanton, Al. 2000, p. 275 ISBN 1-891647-28-8
  6. ^ Marion Herald, April 5, 1887 pg 8
  7. ^ John M. Allman III (ed.), An Abbreviated History of Marion County, Ala. Archived 2014-04-07 at the Wayback Machine - The Marion County Historical & Genealogical Societies, Alabama Tracks vol. XI #4 1992.
  8. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". Census.gov. Retrieved June 6, 2013.
  9. ^ "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31.
  10. ^ "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2015-08-02.
  11. ^ "Explore Census Data". data.census.gov. Retrieved 2021-12-11.
  12. ^ "The Hamilton Mounds Site". Alabama Indigenous Mound Trail. The University of Alabama. Retrieved 2 December 2021.
  13. ^ "Indian Mounds". Visit Hamilton, AL. Hamilton Area Chamber of Commerce. Retrieved 2 December 2021.
  14. ^ "Jerry Brown Arts Festival". Retrieved 2 December 2021.
  15. ^ "Buttahatchee River Fall Fest". Retrieved 2 December 2021.
  16. ^ "Calendar of Events". City of Hamilton, Alabama. Retrieved 2 December 2021.
  17. ^ "Marion County-Rankin Fite Airport". AirNav.com. AirNav, LLC. Retrieved 2 December 2021.

External links