Russ Hodge

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Russ Hodge
Russ Hodge 1966.jpg
Hodge in 1966
Personal information
Born (1939-09-12) September 12, 1939 (age 83)
Roscoe, New York, U.S.
Height190 cm (6 ft 3 in)
Weight102 kg (225 lb)
Sport
SportAthletics
Event(s)Decathlon
ClubSanta Clara Valley Youth Village
Achievements and titles
Personal best(s)100y – 9.6 (1966)
100 m – 10.2 (1970)
400 m – 47.9 (1970)
LJ – 7.69 m (1966)
SP – 18.56 m
DT – 53.13 m (1969)
JT – 64.49 m (1966)[1][2]
Medal record

Russell Arden Hodge (born September 12, 1939)[1][3] is an American track and field athlete, world record holder in decathlon (1966–1967), Olympic competitor from 1964, and silver medalist from the Pan American Games (1971).

Track and field career

Hodge competed at the 1963 Pan American Games in São Paulo, where he finished 4th in decathlon.[1] He competed in decathlon at the 1964 Summer Olympics in Tokyo, where he placed ninth.[1][4][5] In July 1966 he set a world record in decathlon at a competition in Los Angeles, with 8,230 points, a record which lasted until May 1967.[1][4] Hodge received a silver medal in decathlon at the 1971 Pan American Games in Cali, Colombia with a score of 7314, behind winner Rick Wanamaker.[6]

He finished fourth in the AAU National Championship in decathlon in 1963 and in 1964, and second in 1965 and 1966.[7] In 1970 he finished second again, as he did in 1971, after a close race with Rick Wanamaker.[7][8]

Hodge did not compete at the Olympics after 1964. He became injured before the U.S. trials both in 1968 and 1972, and again in 1976.[4][9]

Family

Hodge is son of Alice Arden, who placed ninth in high jump at the 1936 Summer Olympics in Berlin.[10][11] His father Russel "Rusty" Hodge was a semi-professional basketball player, playing center for the Liberty Emeralds.

Awards

In August 2003, both Hodge and his mother were honoured with the Sullivan County Historical Society "History Maker" award.[12] They are the only mother-son Olympians in the United States' Olympic history.[12]

References

  1. ^ a b c d e Evans, Hilary; Gjerde, Arild; Heijmans, Jeroen; Mallon, Bill; et al. "Russ Hodge". Olympics at Sports-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Archived from the original on April 18, 2020. Retrieved August 30, 2008.
  2. ^ Russ Hodge. trackfield.brinkster.net
  3. ^ Russ Hodge at Tilastopaja (registration required)
  4. ^ a b c McMillan, Ken (August 13, 2006). "He never wasted his ability". Times Herald-Record. Retrieved May 18, 2013.
  5. ^ Conway, John (March 28, 2003). "Catskills Olympian earned place in history". Times Herald-Record. Retrieved May 18, 2013.
  6. ^ Pan-American Games, Athletics Weekly 2007. Accessed August 30, 2008.
  7. ^ a b History of US Nationals Results: Decathlon Archived October 31, 2007, at the Wayback Machine, Track and Field News Archive, 2005. Accessed August 30, 2008.
  8. ^ Ho, Ho, Ho Went The Jolly White Giant, Sports Illustrated, June 21, 1971. Accessed 2008-08-30.
  9. ^ Zarnowski, Frank (August 1996). Olympic Glory Denied: And a Final Opportunity for Glory Restored. Griffin Publishing Inc. ISBN 1-882180-70-4.
  10. ^ Evans, Hilary; Gjerde, Arild; Heijmans, Jeroen; Mallon, Bill; et al. "Alice Arden". Olympics at Sports-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Archived from the original on April 18, 2020. Retrieved August 30, 2008.
  11. ^ Mcmillan, Ken (August 24, 2008). "McMillan: Olympians – a title reserved for few". Sports. Times Herald-Record. Retrieved August 30, 2008.
  12. ^ a b Hust, Dan (August 15, 2003). "Historical Society Honors Residents". Sullivan County Democrat. Retrieved August 30, 2008.

External links

Records
Preceded by Men's Decathlon World Record Holder
July 24, 1966 – May 14, 1967
Succeeded by