Discus throw

Athletics
Discus throw
Robert Harting (2008).jpg
German 2012 Olympic champion Robert Harting.
World records
Men Jürgen Schult (GDR) 74.08 m (243 ft 12 in) (1986)
Women Gabriele Reinsch (GDR) 76.80 m (251 ft 11+12 in) (1988)
Olympic records
Men Virgilijus Alekna (LTU) 69.89 m (229 ft 3+12 in) (2004)
Women Martina Hellmann (GDR) 72.30 m (237 ft 2+14 in) (1988)
World Championship records
Men Kristjan Čeh (SLO) 71.13 m (233 ft 4+14 in) (2022)
Women Martina Hellmann  (GDR) 71.62 m (234 ft 11+12 in) (1987)

The discus throw (pronunciation), also known as disc throw, is a track and field event in which an athlete throws a heavy disc—called a discus—in an attempt to mark a farther distance than their competitors. It is an ancient sport, as demonstrated by the fifth-century-BC Myron statue Discobolus. Although not part of the current pentathlon, it was one of the events of the ancient Greek pentathlon, which can be dated back to at least 708 BC,[1] and it is part of the modern decathlon.

History

Modern copy of the Diskophoros, attributed to Alkamenes

The sport of throwing the discus traces back to it being an event in the original Olympic Games of Ancient Greece.[2] The discus as a sport was resurrected in Magdeburg, Germany, by gymnastics teacher Christian Georg Kohlrausch and his students in the 1870s.[3] Organized men's competition was resumed in the late 19th century, and has been a part of the modern Summer Olympic Games since the first modern competition, the 1896 Summer Olympics. Images of discus throwers figured prominently in advertising for early modern Games, such as fundraising stamps for the 1896 Games, and the main posters for the 1920 and 1948 Summer Olympics. Today the sport of discus is a routine part of modern track-and-field meets at all levels, and retains a particularly iconic place in the Olympic Games.

The main poster for the 1920 Summer Olympics

The first modern athlete to throw the discus while rotating the whole body was František Janda-Suk from Bohemia (the present Czech Republic).[4] Janda-Suk invented this technique when studying the position of the famous statue of Discobolus. After only one year of developing the technique, he earned a silver medal in the 1900 Olympics.

Women's competition began in the first decades of the 20th century. Following competition at national and regional levels, it was added to the Olympic program for the 1928 games.

Regulations

The event consists of throwing a disc, with the weight or size depending on the competitor. Men and women throw different sized discs, with varying sizes and weights depending on age. The weight of the discus is either governed by the World Athletics for international or USA Track & Field for the United States.

In the United States, Henry Canine advocated for a lighter-weight discus in high school competition. His suggestion was adopted by the National High School Athletic Association in 1938.[5]

US Weights[6]
Age Men Women
High School 1.6 kg 1 kg
Collegiate 2 kg 1 kg
Professional 2 kg 1 kg
Master's (35-59) 1.5 kg 1 kg
Master's (60-74) 1 kg 1 kg
Master's (75+) 1 kg 0.75 kg
International Weights[7]
Age Men Women
≤17 1.5 kg 1 kg
18-19 1.75 kg 1 kg
20-49 2 kg 1 kg
50-59 1.5 kg 1 kg
60-74 1 kg 1 kg
75+ 1 kg 0.75 kg
Discus (2 kg), IAAF certified for competitions
Side view
Longitudinal section (schematic)

The typical discus has sides made of plastic, wood, fiberglass, carbon fiber or metal with a metal rim and a metal core to attain the weight. The rim must be smooth, with no roughness or finger holds. A discus with more weight in the rim produces greater angular momentum for any given spin rate, and thus more stability, although it is more difficult to throw. However, a higher rim weight, if thrown correctly, can lead to a longer throw. In some competitions, a solid rubber discus is used (see in the United States).

To make a throw, the competitor starts in a circle of 2.5 m (8 ft 2+14 in) diameter, which is recessed in a concrete pad by 20 millimetres (0.79 in). The thrower typically takes an initial stance facing away from the direction of the throw. They then spin anticlockwise (for right-handers) 1+12 times while staying within the circle to build momentum before releasing the discus. The discus must land within a 34.92º circular sector that is centered on the throwing circle.[8] The rules of competition for discus are virtually identical to those of shot put, except that the circle is larger, a stop board is not used and there are no form rules concerning how the discus is to be thrown.

The basic motion is a fore-handed sidearm movement. The discus is spun off the index finger or the middle finger of the throwing hand. In flight the disc spins clockwise when viewed from above for a right-handed thrower, and anticlockwise for a left-handed thrower. As well as achieving maximum momentum in the discus on throwing, the discus' distance is also determined by the trajectory the thrower imparts, as well as the aerodynamic behavior of the discus. Generally, throws into a moderate headwind achieve the maximum distance. Also, a faster-spinning discus imparts greater gyroscopic stability. The technique of discus throwing is quite difficult to master and needs much experience to perfect; thus most top throwers are 30 years old or more.

Discus-thrower, tondo of a kylix by the Kleomelos Painter, Louvre Museum

Phases

The discus technique can be broken down into phases. The purpose is to transfer from the back to the front of the throwing circle while turning through one and a half circles. The speed of delivery is high, and speed is built up during the throw (slow to fast). Correct technique involves the buildup of torque so that maximum force can be applied to the discus on delivery.[9]

Rutger Smith in phases of the discus throw

Initially, the thrower takes up their position in the throwing circle, distributing their body weight evenly over both feet, which are roughly shoulder width apart. They crouch in order to adopt a more efficient posture to start from whilst also isometrically preloading their muscles; this will allow them to start faster and achieve a more powerful throw. They then begin the wind-up, which sets the tone for the entire throw; the rhythm of the wind-up and throw is very important.

Focusing on rhythm can bring about the consistency to get in the right positions that many throwers lack. Executing a sound discus throw with solid technique requires perfect balance. This is due to the throw being a linear movement combined with a one and a half rotation and an implement at the end of one arm. Thus, a good discus thrower needs to maintain balance within the circle.[10]

For a right handed thrower, the next stage is to move the weight over the left foot. From this position the right foot is raised, and the athlete 'runs' across the circle. There are various techniques for this stage where the leg swings out to a small or great extent, some athletes turn on their left heel (e.g. Ilke Wylluda[11]) but turning on the ball of the foot is far more common.

The aim is to land in the 'power position', the right foot should be in the center and the heel should not touch the ground at any point. The left foot should land very quickly after the right. Weight should be mostly over the back foot with as much torque as possible in the body—so the right arm is high and far back. This is very hard to achieve.[12]

The critical stage is the delivery of the discus, from this 'power position' the hips drive through hard, and will be facing the direction of the throw on delivery. Athletes employ various techniques to control the end-point and recover from the throw, such as fixing feet (to pretty much stop dead[11]), or an active reverse spinning onto the left foot (e.g. Virgilijus Alekna[13]).

Sports scientist Richard Ganslen researched the Aerodynamics of the Discus, reporting the discus will stall at an angle of 29°.[14]

Culture

The discus throw has been the subject of a number of well-known ancient Greek statues and Roman copies such as the Discobolus and Discophoros. The discus throw also appears repeatedly in ancient Greek mythology, featured as a means of manslaughter in the cases of Hyacinth, Crocus, Phocus, and Acrisius, and as a named event in the funeral games of Patroclus.

Discus throwers have been selected as a main motif in numerous collectors' coins. One of the recent samples is the €10 Greek Discus commemorative coin, minted in 2003 to commemorate the 2004 Summer Olympics. On the obverse of the coin a modern athlete is seen in the foreground in a half-turned position, while in the background an ancient discus thrower has been captured in a lively bending motion, with the discus high above his head, creating a vivid representation of the sport.

All-time top 25

Men

Ath.# Perf.# Mark Athlete Nation Date Place Ref
1 1 74.08 m (243 ft 12 in) Jürgen Schult  East Germany 06 JUN 1986 Neubrandenburg
2 2 73.88 m (242 ft 4+12 in) Virgilijus Alekna  Lithuania 03 AUG 2000 Kaunas
3 3 73.38 m (240 ft 8+34 in) Gerd Kanter  Estonia 04 SEP 2006 Helsingborg
4 72.02 m (236 ft 3+14 in) Kanter #2 03 MAY 2007 Salinas
5 71.88 m (235 ft 9+34 in) Kanter #3 08 MAY 2008 Salinas
4 6 71.86 m (235 ft 9 in) Yuriy Dumchev  Soviet Union 29 MAY 1983 Moscow
Daniel Ståhl  Sweden 29 JUN 2019 Bottnaryd [17]
6 8 71.84 m (235 ft 8+14 in) Piotr Małachowski  Poland 08 JUN 2013 Hengelo
7 9 71.70 m (235 ft 2+34 in) Róbert Fazekas  Hungary 14 JUL 2002 Szombathely
10 71.64 m (235 ft 14 in) Kanter #4 25 JUN 2009 Kohila
11 71.56 m (234 ft 9+14 in) Alekna #2 25 JUL 2007 Kaunas
8 12 71.50 m (234 ft 6+34 in) Lars Riedel  Germany 03 MAY 1997 Wiesbaden
13 71.47 m (234 ft 5+34 in) Ståhl #2 21 JUN 2022 Uppsala [18]
14 71.45 m (234 ft 4+34 in) Kanter #5 29 APR 2010 Chula Vista
15 71.40 m (234 ft 3 in) Ståhl #3 10 JUL 2021 Bottnaryd
16 71.37 m (234 ft 1+34 in) Ståhl #4 10 AUG 2020 Sollentuna
9 17 71.32 m (233 ft 11+34 in) Ben Plucknett  United States 04 JUN 1983 Eugene
18 71.29 m (233 ft 10+12 in) Ståhl #5 29 JUN 2017 Sollentuna
10 19 71.27 m (233 ft 9+34 in) Kristjan Čeh  Slovenia 21 MAY 2022 Birmingham [19]
11 20 71.26 m (233 ft 9+12 in) John Powell  United States 09 JUN 1984 San Jose
Rickard Bruch  Sweden 15 NOV 1984 Malmö
Imrich Bugár  Czechoslovakia 25 MAY 1985 San Jose
23 71.25 m (233 ft 9 in) Fazekas #2 21 SEP 2002 Madrid
Alekna #3 20 MAY 2008 Turnov
25 71.23 m (233 ft 8+14 in) Čeh #2 08 AUG 2022 Székesfehérvár [20]
14 71.18 m (233 ft 6+14 in) Art Burns  United States 19 JUL 1983 San Jose
15 71.16 m (233 ft 5+12 in) Wolfgang Schmidt  East Germany 09 AUG 1978 Berlin
16 71.14 m (233 ft 4+34 in) Anthony Washington  United States 22 MAY 1996 Salinas
17 71.06 m (233 ft 1+12 in) Luis Delís  Cuba 21 MAY 1983 Havana
18 70.98 m (232 ft 10+14 in) Mac Wilkins  United States 09 JUL 1980 Helsinki
19 70.82 m (232 ft 4 in) Aleksander Tammert  Estonia 15 APR 2006 Denton
20 70.78 m (232 ft 2+12 in) Fedrick Dacres  Jamaica 16 JUN 2019 Rabat [21]
21 70.66 m (231 ft 9+34 in) Robert Harting  Germany 22 MAY 2012 Turnov
22 70.54 m (231 ft 5 in) Dmitriy Shevchenko  Russia 07 MAY 2002 Krasnodar
23 70.38 m (230 ft 10+34 in) Jay Silvester  United States 16 MAY 1971 Lancaster
24 70.32 m (230 ft 8+12 in) Frantz Kruger  South Africa 26 MAY 2002 Salon-de-Provence
25 70.29 m (230 ft 7+14 in) Mauricio Ortega  Colombia 22 JUL 2020 Lovelhe [22]

Notable series

At the 2019 Diamond League Meeting in Doha, Qatar, Daniel Ståhl became the first man to produce six throws beyond 69.50 in a single competition.[23]

Annulled marks

  • Ben Plucknett also threw a world record of 72.34 in Stockholm on 7 July 1981. This performance was annulled due to doping offences.
  • Kamy Keshmiri threw 70.84 in Salinas on 27 May 1992. This performance was annulled due to doping offences.

Non-legal marks

  • Rickard Bruch also threw 72.18 at an exhibition meeting in Piteå on 23 July 1974.
  • John Powell also threw 72.08 in Klagshamn on 11 September 1987, but the throw was made onto a sloping/downhill sector.

Women

Ath.# Perf.# Mark Athlete Nation Date Place Ref
1 1 76.80 m (251 ft 11+12 in) Gabriele Reinsch  East Germany 09 JUL 1988 Neubrandenburg
2 2 74.56 m (244 ft 7+14 in) Zdeňka Šilhavá  Czechoslovakia 26 AUG 1984 Nitra
Ilke Wyludda  East Germany 23 JUL 1989 Neubrandenburg
4 74.44 m (244 ft 2+12 in) Reinsch #2 13 SEP 1988 Berlin
5 74.40 m (244 ft 1 in) Wyludda #2 13 SEP 1988 Berlin
4 6 74.08 m (243 ft 12 in) Diana Gansky  East Germany 20 JUN 1987 Karl-Marx-Stadt
7 73.90 m (242 ft 5+14 in) Gansky #2 27 JUN 1987 Prague
8 73.42 m (240 ft 10+12 in) Reinsch #3 12 JUN 1988 Karl-Marx-Stadt
5 9 73.36 m (240 ft 8 in) Irina Meszynski  East Germany 17 AUG 1984 Prague
10 73.32 m (240 ft 6+12 in) Gansky #2 11 JUN 1987 Neubrandenburg
6 11 73.28 m (240 ft 5 in) Galina Savinkova  Soviet Union 08 SEP 1984 Donetsk
12 73.26 m (240 ft 4+14 in) Savinkova #2 22 MAY 1983 Leselidze
Gansky #3 06 JUN 1986 Neubrandenburg
14 73.24 m (240 ft 3+14 in) Gansky #4 29 MAY 1987 Leipzig
7 15 73.22 m (240 ft 2+12 in) Tsvetanka Khristova  Bulgaria 19 APR 1987 Kazanlak
16 73.16 m (240 ft 14 in) Wyludda #3 13 SEP 1988 Berlin
8 17 73.10 m (239 ft 9+34 in) Gisela Beyer  East Germany 20 JUL 1984 Berlin
18 73.04 m (239 ft 7+12 in) Gansky #5 06 JUN 1987 Potsdam
Wyludda #4 05 AUG 1989 Gateshead
20 72.96 m (239 ft 4+14 in) Savinkova #3 23 JUN 1985 Erfurt
21 72.94 m (239 ft 3+12 in) Gansky #6 09 JUL 1988 Neubrandenburg
9 22 72.92 m (239 ft 2+34 in) Martina Hellmann  East Germany 20 AUG 1987 Potsdam
23 72.78 m (238 ft 9+14 in) Hellmann #2 11 JUN 1987 Neubrandenburg
Reinsch #4 29 JUN 1988 Berlin
25 72.72 m (238 ft 6+34 in) Wyludda #5 23 JUN 1989 Neubrandenburg
10 72.14 m (236 ft 8 in) Galina Murashova  Soviet Union 17 AUG 1984 Prague
11 71.80 m (235 ft 6+34 in) Mariya Vergova  Bulgaria 13 JUL 1980 Sofia
12 71.68 m (235 ft 2 in) Xiao Yanling  China 14 MAR 1992 Beijing
13 71.58 m (234 ft 10 in) Ellina Zvereva  Soviet Union 12 JUN 1988 Leningrad
14 71.50 m (234 ft 6+34 in) Evelin Jahl  East Germany 10 MAY 1980 Potsdam
15 71.46 m (234 ft 5+14 in) Valarie Allman  United States 08 APR 2022 San Diego [26]
16 71.41 m (234 ft 3+14 in) Sandra Perković  Croatia 18 JUL 2017 Bellinzona [27]
17 71.30 m (233 ft 11 in) Larisa Korotkevich  Russia 29 MAY 1992 Sochi
18 71.22 m (233 ft 7+34 in) Ria Stalman  Netherlands 15 JUL 1984 Walnut
19 70.88 m (232 ft 6+12 in) Hilda Ramos  Cuba 08 MAY 1992 Havana
20 70.80 m (232 ft 3+14 in) Larisa Mikhalchenko  Soviet Union 18 JUN 1988 Kharkiv
21 70.68 m (231 ft 10+12 in) Maritza Martén  Cuba 18 JUL 1992 Seville
22 70.65 m (231 ft 9+14 in) Denia Caballero  Cuba 20 JUN 2015 Bilbao [28]
23 70.50 m (231 ft 3+12 in) Faina Melnik  Soviet Union 24 APR 1976 Sochi
24 70.34 m (230 ft 9+14 in) Silvia Madetzky  East Germany 16 MAY 1988 Athens
25 70.22 m (230 ft 4+12 in) Jorinde van Klinken  Netherlands 22 MAY 2021 Tucson

Annulled marks

Non-legal marks

Olympic medalists

Men

Games Gold Silver Bronze
1896 Athens
details
Robert Garrett
 United States
Panagiotis Paraskevopoulos
 Greece
Sotirios Versis
 Greece
1900 Paris
details
Rudolf Bauer
 Hungary
František Janda-Suk
 Bohemia
Richard Sheldon
 United States
1904 St. Louis
details
Martin Sheridan
 United States
Ralph Rose
 United States
Nikolaos Georgantas
 Greece
1908 London
details
Martin Sheridan
 United States
Merritt Giffin
 United States
Bill Horr
 United States
1912 Stockholm
details
Armas Taipale
 Finland
Richard Byrd
 United States
James Duncan
 United States
1920 Antwerp
details
Elmer Niklander
 Finland
Armas Taipale
 Finland
Gus Pope
 United States
1924 Paris
details
Bud Houser
 United States
Vilho Niittymaa
 Finland
Thomas Lieb
 United States
1928 Amsterdam
details
Bud Houser
 United States
Antero Kivi
 Finland
James Corson
 United States
1932 Los Angeles
details
John Anderson
 United States
Henri LaBorde
 United States
Paul Winter
 France
1936 Berlin
details
Ken Carpenter
 United States
Gordon Dunn
 United States
Giorgio Oberweger
 Italy
1948 London
details
Adolfo Consolini
 Italy
Giuseppe Tosi
 Italy
Fortune Gordien
 United States
1952 Helsinki
details
Sim Iness
 United States
Adolfo Consolini
 Italy
James Dillion
 United States
1956 Melbourne
details
Al Oerter
 United States
Fortune Gordien
 United States
Des Koch
 United States
1960 Rome
details
Al Oerter
 United States
Rink Babka
 United States
Dick Cochran
 United States
1964 Tokyo
details
Al Oerter
 United States
Ludvík Daněk
 Czechoslovakia
Dave Weill
 United States
1968 Mexico City
details
Al Oerter
 United States
Lothar Milde
 East Germany
Ludvík Daněk
 Czechoslovakia
1972 Munich
details
Ludvík Daněk
 Czechoslovakia
Jay Silvester
 United States
Ricky Bruch
 Sweden
1976 Montreal
details
Mac Wilkins
 United States
Wolfgang Schmidt
 East Germany
John Powell
 United States
1980 Moscow
details
Viktor Rashchupkin
 Soviet Union
Imrich Bugár
 Czechoslovakia
Luis Delís
 Cuba
1984 Los Angeles
details
Rolf Danneberg
 West Germany
Mac Wilkins
 United States
John Powell
 United States
1988 Seoul
details
Jürgen Schult
 East Germany
Romas Ubartas
 Soviet Union
Rolf Danneberg
 West Germany
1992 Barcelona
details
Romas Ubartas
 Lithuania
Jürgen Schult
 Germany
Roberto Moya
 Cuba
1996 Atlanta
details
Lars Riedel
 Germany
Vladimir Dubrovshchik
 Belarus
Vasiliy Kaptyukh
 Belarus
2000 Sydney
details
Virgilijus Alekna
 Lithuania
Lars Riedel
 Germany
Frantz Kruger
 South Africa
2004 Athens
details
Virgilijus Alekna
 Lithuania
Zoltán Kővágó
 Hungary
Aleksander Tammert
 Estonia
2008 Beijing
details
Gerd Kanter
 Estonia
Piotr Małachowski
 Poland
Virgilijus Alekna
 Lithuania
2012 London
details
Robert Harting
 Germany
Ehsan Haddadi
 Iran
Gerd Kanter
 Estonia
2016 Rio de Janeiro
details
Christoph Harting
 Germany
Piotr Małachowski
 Poland
Daniel Jasinski
 Germany
2020 Tokyo
details
Daniel Ståhl
 Sweden
Simon Pettersson
 Sweden
Lukas Weißhaidinger
 Austria

Women

Games Gold Silver Bronze
1928 Amsterdam
details
Halina Konopacka
 Poland
Lillian Copeland
 United States
Ruth Svedberg
 Sweden
1932 Los Angeles
details
Lillian Copeland
 United States
Ruth Osburn
 United States
Jadwiga Wajs
 Poland
1936 Berlin
details
Gisela Mauermayer
 Germany
Jadwiga Wajs
 Poland
Paula Mollenhauer
 Germany
1948 London
details
Micheline Ostermeyer
 France
Edera Gentile
 Italy
Jacqueline Mazéas
 France
1952 Helsinki
details
Nina Romashkova
 Soviet Union
Yelisaveta Bagriantseva  Soviet Union Nina Dumbadze
 Soviet Union
1956 Melbourne
details
Olga Fikotová
 Czechoslovakia
Irina Beglyakova
 Soviet Union
Nina Romashkova
 Soviet Union
1960 Rome
details
Nina Romashkova
 Soviet Union
Tamara Press
 Soviet Union
Lia Manoliu
 Romania
1964 Tokyo
details
Tamara Press
 Soviet Union
Ingrid Lotz
 United Team of Germany
Lia Manoliu
 Romania
1968 Mexico City
details
Lia Manoliu
 Romania
Liesel Westermann
 West Germany
Jolán Kleiber-Kontsek
 Hungary
1972 Munich
details
Faina Melnik
 Soviet Union
Argentina Menis
 Romania
Vasilka Stoeva
 Bulgaria
1976 Montreal
details
Evelin Schlaak
 East Germany
Mariya Vergova
 Bulgaria
Gabriele Hinzmann
 East Germany
1980 Moscow
details
Evelin Jahl
 East Germany
Mariya Petkova
 Bulgaria
Tatyana Lesovaya
 Soviet Union
1984 Los Angeles
details
Ria Stalman
 Netherlands
Leslie Deniz
 United States
Florența Crăciunescu
 Romania
1988 Seoul
details
Martina Hellmann
 East Germany
Diana Gansky
 East Germany
Tsvetanka Khristova
 Bulgaria
1992 Barcelona
details
Maritza Martén
 Cuba
Tsvetanka Khristova
 Bulgaria
Daniela Costian
 Australia
1996 Atlanta
details
Ilke Wyludda
 Germany
Natalya Sadova
 Russia
Ellina Zvereva
 Belarus
2000 Sydney
details
Ellina Zvereva
 Belarus
Anastasia Kelesidou
 Greece
Iryna Yatchenko
 Belarus
2004 Athens
details
Natalya Sadova
 Russia
Anastasia Kelesidou
 Greece
Věra Pospíšilová-Cechlová
 Czech Republic[29]
2008 Beijing
details
Stephanie Brown Trafton
 United States
Olena Antonova
 Ukraine
Song Aimin
 China
2012 London
details
Sandra Perković
 Croatia
Li Yanfeng
 China
Yarelys Barrios
 Cuba
2016 Rio de Janeiro
details
Sandra Perković
 Croatia
Mélina Robert-Michon
 France
Denia Caballero
 Cuba
2020 Tokyo
details
Valarie Allman
 United States
Kristin Pudenz
 Germany
Yaime Pérez
 Cuba

World Championships medalists

Men

Championships Gold Silver Bronze
1983 Helsinki
details
 Imrich Bugár (TCH)  Luis Delís (CUB)  Géjza Valent (TCH)
1987 Rome
details
 Jürgen Schult (GDR)  John Powell (USA)  Luis Delís (CUB)
1991 Tokyo
details
 Lars Riedel (GER)  Erik de Bruin (NED)  Attila Horváth (HUN)
1993 Stuttgart
details
 Lars Riedel (GER)  Dmitry Shevchenko (RUS)  Jürgen Schult (GER)
1995 Gothenburg
details
 Lars Riedel (GER)  Vladimir Dubrovshchik (BLR)  Vasiliy Kaptyukh (BLR)
1997 Athens
details
 Lars Riedel (GER)  Virgilijus Alekna (LTU)  Jürgen Schult (GER)
1999 Seville
details
 Anthony Washington (USA)  Jürgen Schult (GER)  Lars Riedel (GER)
2001 Edmonton
details
 Lars Riedel (GER)  Virgilijus Alekna (LTU)  Michael Möllenbeck (GER)
2003 Saint-Denis
details
 Virgilijus Alekna (LTU)  Róbert Fazekas (HUN)  Vasiliy Kaptyukh (BLR)
2005 Helsinki
details
 Virgilijus Alekna (LTU)  Gerd Kanter (EST)  Michael Möllenbeck (GER)
2007 Osaka
details
 Gerd Kanter (EST)  Robert Harting (GER)  Rutger Smith (NED)
2009 Berlin
details
 Robert Harting (GER)  Piotr Małachowski (POL)  Gerd Kanter (EST)
2011 Daegu
details
 Robert Harting (GER)  Gerd Kanter (EST)  Ehsan Haddadi (IRI)
2013 Moscow
details
 Robert Harting (GER)  Piotr Małachowski (POL)  Gerd Kanter (EST)
2015 Beijing
details
 Piotr Małachowski (POL)  Philip Milanov (BEL)  Robert Urbanek (POL)
2017 London
details
 Andrius Gudžius (LTU)  Daniel Ståhl (SWE)  Mason Finley (USA)
2019 Doha
details
 Daniel Ståhl (SWE)  Fedrick Dacres (JAM)  Lukas Weißhaidinger (AUT)
2022 Eugene
details
 Kristjan Čeh  (SLO)  Mykolas Alekna (LTU)  Andrius Gudžius (LTU)

Women

Championships Gold Silver Bronze
1983 Helsinki
details
 Martina Opitz (GDR)  Galina Murašova (URS)  Mariya Petkova (BUL)
1987 Rome
details
 Martina Hellmann (GDR)  Diana Gansky (GDR)  Tsvetanka Khristova (BUL)
1991 Tokyo
details
 Tsvetanka Khristova (BUL)  Ilke Wyludda (GER)  Larisa Mikhalchenko (URS)
1993 Stuttgart
details
 Olga Chernyavskaya (RUS)  Daniela Costian (AUS)  Min Chunfeng (CHN)
1995 Gothenburg
details
 Ellina Zvereva (BLR)  Ilke Wyludda (GER)  Olga Chernyavskaya (RUS)
1997 Athens
details
 Beatrice Faumuina (NZL)  Ellina Zvereva (BLR)  Natalya Sadova (RUS)
1999 Seville
details
 Franka Dietzsch (GER)  Anastasia Kelesidou (GRE)  Nicoleta Grasu (ROU)
2001 Edmonton
details
 Ellina Zvereva (BLR)  Nicoleta Grasu (ROU)  Anastasia Kelesidou (GRE)
2003 Saint-Denis
details
 Iryna Yatchenko (BLR)  Anastasia Kelesidou (GRE)  Ekaterini Voggoli (GRE)
2005 Helsinki
details
 Franka Dietzsch (GER)  Natalya Sadova (RUS)  Věra Pospíšilová-Cechlová (CZE)
2007 Osaka
details
 Franka Dietzsch (GER)  Yarelis Barrios (CUB)  Nicoleta Grasu (ROU)
2009 Berlin
details
 Dani Samuels (AUS)  Yarelis Barrios (CUB)  Nicoleta Grasu (ROU)
2011 Daegu
details
 Li Yanfeng (CHN)  Nadine Müller (GER)  Yarelis Barrios (CUB)
2013 Moscow
details
 Sandra Perković (CRO)  Mélina Robert-Michon (FRA)  Yarelis Barrios (CUB)
2015 Beijing
details
 Denia Caballero (CUB)  Sandra Perković (CRO)  Nadine Müller (GER)
2017 London
details
 Sandra Perković (CRO)  Dani Stevens (AUS)  Mélina Robert-Michon (FRA)
2019 Doha
details
 Yaime Pérez (CUB)  Denia Caballero (CUB)  Sandra Perković (CRO)
2022 Eugene
details
 Feng Bin (CHN)  Sandra Perković (CRO)  Valarie Allman (USA)

Season's bests

See also

Notes and references

  1. ^ "Sports - List of Summer and Winter Olympic Sports". olympic.org. 14 January 2018.
  2. ^ "Discus Throwing | Encyclopedia.com". www.encyclopedia.com. Retrieved 2020-03-11.
  3. ^ "History of Discus". www.discusnada.org. Retrieved 2020-03-11.
  4. ^ "Discus Throw". site.dev.aws.worldathletics.org. Retrieved 2020-10-26.
  5. ^ "Henry E. Canine resigns as mentor at high school in Aledo". The Daily Times (Davenport, Iowa). August 30, 1938. Retrieved December 6, 2021.
  6. ^ "Track and Field Throwing Implement Weight Requirements Rules". www.everythingtrackandfield.com. Retrieved 2020-03-11.
  7. ^ "Book of Rules | Official Documents". www.worldathletics.org. Retrieved 2020-03-11.
  8. ^ "The Rules and Regulations Every Discus Thrower Should Be Aware Of". Sports Aspire. 2009-11-04. Retrieved 2020-03-11.
  9. ^ Rosenbaum, Mike (2018-12-11). "How to Throw a Discus Step-By-Step". LiveAbout. Retrieved 2020-03-11.
  10. ^ Cappos, Scott. "Shot Put and Discus Technique and Training". Digital Track and Field.
  11. ^ a b throwhammer (13 September 2010). "wyludda discus throw 1996 olympics". Archived from the original on 2021-10-31 – via YouTube.
  12. ^ Power position, about.com
  13. ^ ntujavelin (26 December 2008). "2005 World Championship Men's Discus - 1st Virgilijus Alekna". Archived from the original on 2021-10-31 – via YouTube.
  14. ^ "Archived copy" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on 2016-03-07. Retrieved 2016-03-02.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  15. ^ Discus Throw - men - senior - outdoor. IAAF. Retrieved on 2014-01-20.
  16. ^ "All-time men's best Discus Throw". alltime-athletics.com. 21 July 2019. Retrieved 28 July 2019.
  17. ^ "Stahl goes to equal fourth on the world all-time discus list with 71.86m". European Athletics. 29 June 2019. Retrieved 20 July 2019.
  18. ^ "Daniel Ståhl with the best new year in the world in Uppsala". rockedbuzz.com. 21 June 2022. Retrieved 22 June 2022.
  19. ^ Jess Whittington (21 May 2022). "Ceh and Mihambo fabulous in the field in Birmingham". World Athetlics. Retrieved 10 June 2022.
  20. ^ Chris Broadbent (8 August 2022). "McLaughlin sets European all-comers' record of 51.68 in Szekesfehervar". World Athletics. Retrieved 22 August 2022.
  21. ^ "Discus Throw Results" (PDF). sportresult.com. 16 June 2019. Archived (PDF) from the original on 2019-06-23. Retrieved 23 June 2019.
  22. ^ Bob Ramsak (24 July 2020). "Dadic impresses in one-hour heptathlon, Ortega smashes South American discus record". World Athletics. Retrieved 24 July 2020.
  23. ^ Bob Ramsak (3 May 2019). "Stahl sends discus beyond 70 metres in Doha – IAAF Diamond League". IAAF. Retrieved 3 May 2019.
  24. ^ Discus Throw - women - senior - outdoor. IAAF. Retrieved on 2014-01-20.
  25. ^ "All-time women's best Discus Throw". alltime-athletics.com. 23 June 2019. Retrieved 28 July 2019.
  26. ^ Diego Sampaolo (9 April 2022). "Allman breaks North American discus record with 71.46m in La Jolla". World Athletics. Retrieved 20 April 2022.
  27. ^ Diego Sampaolo (19 July 2017). "Perkovic throws 71.41m in Bellinzona, world's best discus mark since 1992". IAAF. Retrieved 19 July 2017.
  28. ^ "Denia Caballero sets Discus world lead of 70.65, Pichardo debuts in long jump". watchathletics.com. 21 June 2015. Retrieved 21 June 2015.
  29. ^ Day 2 of IOC Executive Board meeting in St. Petersburg . Olympic (2013-05-30). Retrieved on 2014-04-19.

External links