Wallace Community College

George C. Wallace State Community College
Wallace Community College
Wallace Community College.png
WCC logo
Former names
George C. Wallace State Technical Trade School; George C. Wallace State Vocational Trade School; George C. Wallace State Technical Junior College; Alabama Aviation and Technical College; Sparks State Technical School; Sparks State Technical College
TypePublic community college
Established1947
Parent institution
Alabama Community College System
PresidentLinda C. Young
Students3,958[1]
Location,
31°19′03″N 85°27′53″W / 31.31745°N 85.46460°W / 31.31745; -85.46460
MascotThe Governors
Websitewww.wallace.edu
Athletic wcc logo.gif

Wallace Community College (WCC) (formally known as George C. Wallace State Community College) is a public community college in Dothan, Alabama. It is named after governor and outspoken segregationist George Wallace. It enrolls 3,958 students and has been accredited by the Commission on Colleges of the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools since 1969.[2] As of 2017, the college has three campuses: the Wallace Campus and the Center for Economic and Workforce Development in Dothan, and the Sparks Campus in Eufaula.

Established in 1949, George C. Wallace Community College, with campuses in Dothan and Eufaula, is one of the largest and oldest community colleges in Alabama. It is part of the Alabama Community College System.

Athletics

WCC maintains a men's junior college baseball team affiliated with the Southern Conference and women's softball team. Even though known as a men's junior college baseball school, back in 2001, the Wallace Community College Men's Basketball team won the AJCCC State Championship under coach Eddie Barnes and Assistant Coaches Philip M. Cassis and Tom Helmeyer. The team also made it to the NJCAA final four and finished third in the Nation. The baseball team is currently coached by former Major League Baseball catcher Mackey Sasser.

References

  1. ^ "George C. Wallace Community College at Dothan". College Board. 2009. Retrieved 2009-03-27.
  2. ^ "Institution Details". Commission on Colleges. 2008. Retrieved 2009-03-27.

External links